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• In a clinical study on adults with difficulty swallowing tablets 98 % of the subjects stated that it was easier to swallow tablets coated with MEDCOAT® compared to identical uncoated tablets. The study also showed that MEDCOAT® could completely camouflage the taste of a bitter flavoured tablet for 100 % of the subjects. The study has been published in the journal Pharmacy World & Science/International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy (PharmWorldSci:2010;32,420-423). www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20524068


• A clinical study at Karolinska University Hospital on sick children aged 2-17 years with difficulties taking their medication found that MEDCOAT® made it easier to swallow tablets for 87% of the children and improved palatability for 85%. The study has been published in the journal Acta Pædiatrica. (Acta Pædiatrica 2015;104, 956–961). www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4744733/


• A literature search concerning risks for interaction between the ingredients in MEDCOAT® and drugs have been performed. The study was performed by Folke Sjöqvist, professor emeritus in clinical pharmacology at Karolinska Institutet, in cooperation with Karolinska Drug Information Center (Karolic) at Karolinska University Hospital. They study did not find any risks that the ingredients in MEDCOAT® would interact with drugs in a way that the drug's effect could be affected. (Sjöqvist F: Regarding possible risks for interactions between drugs and substances in the tablet coating developed by Med Coat. Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet. March 2005.)


• A study performed at the department of Pharmacy at Uppsala university showed that the MedCoat® coating disintegrates quickly after swallowing (on average 47 seconds) and thereby does not hindre the uptake of the drug. (Alderborn G, Olsson C: An investigation of the effect of a coating applied by the MedCoat coating device on the disintegration time of some preparations. Dept of Pharmacy, Uppsala University. Dec 2009.)


• In a Norwegian study of 6158 persons visiting a general practitioner, 30 % of the women and 15 % of the men stated that they had difficulty swallowing tablets. (Andersen Ø, Zweidorf O-K, Hjelde T, Rødland EA: Problemer med å svelge tabletter [Problems when swallowing tablets. A questionnaire study from general practice]. Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 1995;115:947-9.) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7709385


• In a German study of 1051 patients visiting general practices reveled that 37.4 % reported having had problems with swallowing solid drugs at some time and 27.2 % had swallowing difficulties with their current tablets and capsules. 9.4 % of the affected patients indicated to be non-adherent with their medication due to their swallowing difficulties. Only 6.7 % of all patients had ever been asked about such problems by their doctor and 4.1 % by their pharmacist. Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2013 Apr;69(4):937-48 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23052416